BUSINESS CREDIT, Business Strategies, business taxes, General Information, RUNNING YOUR BUSINESS, Self Employed, TAX DEBT RELIEF, Tax Reduction, TAXES

Commercial Fuel Card Without A Personal Guarantee.

gas card

Commercial Fuel Card

Gas Cards Without A Personal Guarantee

Would you like to free up some cash so that you can increase your marketing budget, purchase more supplies, or reward your employees? Have you heard about obtaining business credit without a personal guarantee, but haven’t been able to secure your own business credit? Are you a small business owner that has damaged personal credit? Have you been told that you can’t get business credit if you have bad personal credit? If any of these things apply to you, you’ve come to the right place!
To start, let us explain what a “personal guarantee is.” A personal guarantee means that the owners will be held personally liable for the debts of their business. Suppose you have a LLC Howard Tax Prep LLC has partnered with a national gas chain (comparable with Exon Mobil, Citgo, etc. with over 18,000 locations worldwide) to offer small business owners (being defined as businesses with revenues under 1 million dollars) fuel cards that report business payment history to Dunn and Brad Street, and Equifax every 30 days!
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Only verified businesses that are structured as a LLC, S-Corp, or C-Corp with a Dun and Brad Street number will qualify. Because this is not a publicly marketed program, your business must be verified, prior to receiving the name of the fuel company (but trust us, you can find a station near you).  

The best part about this offer? THE CARDS ARE ISSUED WITHOUT ANY PERSONAL LIABILITY TO THE OWNERS, & WITHOUT THE USE OF THE OWNERS PERSONAL CREDIT. If you need a truck driver fuel card, Uber driver fuel card, Lyft driver fuel card, or just a general small business owner fuel card, we can help! 

WHAT ARE THE DETAILS?

  • National fuel provider. Qualified businesses that are ready to move forward will be given the name of the fuel company prior to paying the 1 time $49.95 Howard Tax Prep LLC processing fee.
  • Minimum deposit of $200 for a $500 credit line is required.
  • Accounts are reviewed every quarter for credit line increases.
  • After 12 months of ON TIME PAYMENTS, your deposit will be returned.

WHAT ARE THE REQUIREMENTS?

  • Business Must Be Structured As A LLC, Corporation, or S-corporation.
  • Must have a BUSINESS CHECKING account.
  • Must Agree To Make ON-TIME Payments.
  • Deposit Payment Can Only Be Drafted From Business Checking account.

Who should use fuel cards?

Owner Operator Truck Driver

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Owner Operator Truck Drivers no longer have to use personal credit cards or cash profits to purchase fuel! Reduce driver fraud by setting fuel limits & restricting usage. Save on fuel cost, while building your business credit Paydex score.     

  • The principal or owner is not personally liable for any bad debt.
  • The account will be in the name of the business.
  • Helps to Establish & build business credit.
  • Account payment history reported to DnB and Equifax every 30 days.
  • Accepted at over 18,000 locations Worldwide.
  • Free online invoicing.
  • Activate new cards as needed.
  • Restrict cards with fuel only limits & purchase restrictions during non-business hours.
  • Save up to 6¢/gal* on fuel purchases at thousands of locations in the U.S.
  • Earn rebates on fuel at branded locations.

GET YOUR CARD NOW!

Small Business Owner

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Small business owners no more using your profits & personal credit cards to cover fuel cost. Use the cash you save and apply it toward marketing, inventory, and more! Save on fuel cost, while building your business credit Paydex score. 

  • The principal or owner is not personally liable for any bad debt.
  • The account will be in the name of the business.
  • Helps to Establish & build business credit.
  • Account payment history reported to DnB and Equifax every 30 days.
  • Accepted at over 18,000 locations Worldwide.
  • Free online invoicing.
  • Activate new cards as needed.
  • Restrict cards with fuel only limits & purchase restrictions during non-business hours.
  • Save up to 6¢/gal* on fuel purchases at thousands of locations in the U.S.
  • Earn rebates on fuel at branded locations.

GET YOUR CARD NOW! 

Uber & Lyft Driver

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Uber and Lyft Drivers that would like to build their business credit, and free up their cash flow. Use your additional cash flow for brake repairs, oil changes, and more! Save on fuel cost, while building your business credit Paydex score.  

  • The principal or owner is not personally liable for any bad debt.
  • The account will be in the name of the business.
  • Helps to Establish & build business credit.
  • Account payment history reported to DnB and Equifax every 30 days.
  • Accepted at over 18,000 locations Worldwide.
  • Free online invoicing.
  • Activate new cards as needed.
  • Restrict cards with fuel only limits & purchase restrictions during non-business hours.
  • Save up to 6¢/gal* on fuel purchases at thousands of locations in the U.S.
  • Earn rebates on fuel at branded locations.

 GET YOUR CARD NOW!  

How easy it to use the card?

image43

 1-2-3 Driver Instructions 

  • Swipe card
  • Enter driver ID when prompted (may also be call DIN or PIN)
  • Enter odometer reading when prompted
  • The principal or owner is not personally liable for any bad debt.
  • The account will be in the name of the business.
  • Helps to Establish & build business credit.
  • Account payment history reported to DnB and Equifax every 30 days.
  • Accepted at over 18,000 locations Worldwide.
  • Free online invoicing.
  • Activate new cards as needed.
  • Restrict cards with fuel only limits & purchase restrictions during non-business hours.
  • Save up to 6¢/gal* on fuel purchases at thousands of locations in the U.S.
  • Earn rebates on fuel at branded locations.

 GET YOUR CARD NOW! 

 

business taxes, Family Tax Issues, General Information, Self Employed, Tax Reduction, TAXES

Now that you’ve filed, do you need to tell your employer to withhold more or less income to pay your 2019 taxes?

man holding white paper

Reprinted with changes, edits, & permission by the IRS.

Was your refund lower than expected, or did you have an unexpected tax bill when you filed this year? In our south loop Chicago tax preparation office, we saw a slight decrease in income tax refunds for personal 1040 taxes. On the other hand, many of our Chicago business tax preparation clients saw a decrease in their taxes dues thanks to the Tax Cut and Jobs Act. If you are concerned about your tax bill for the 2019 tax year, there are steps that you can take steps to make sure your federal income tax withholding is on the right track for this year.
Checking your withholding at the beginning of the year helps ensure you don’t have too little or too much withheld from your paychecks throughout the year. This is especially
important if you changed your withholding in 2018. A mid-year withholding change in 2018 can have a different full-year impact in 2019. You should also check your withholding any time your personal or financial information changes. Use the Withholding Calculator to help you decide whether you need to change your
withholding.

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Federal taxes operate on a pay-as-you-go basis. This means that you need to pay most of your tax during the year, as you earn the income. Paying too much tax throughout the year will result in a refund while not paying enough can lead to a tax bill, penalties and interest when you file. One way to avoid owing a balance is to correctly calculate and adjust how much tax you should have withheld from your wages. Use the Withholding Calculator to help you decide whether you need to change your withholding.

Another option is to consider making quarterly estimated tax payments. Those who
don’t pay taxes through withholding, or don’t pay enough tax that way, may still use the Withholding Calculator to determine if they have to pay estimated tax quarterly during the year to the IRS. Those who are self-employed generally pay tax this way. See Form
1040-ES, Estimated Taxes for Individuals, for details. Visit IRS.gov/payasyougo to learn more about withholding and to determine if you should be making estimated tax payments. You are in the driver’s seat. Check your withholding today.

Although we’ve given you the basics, this is not an all-inclusive article. Should you have tax debt help questions, need Chicago business tax preparation, business entity creation, business insurance, or business compliance assistance please contact us online, or call our office toll free at 1-855-743-5765 or locally in Chicago or Indiana at 1-708-529-6604. Make sure to join our newsletter for more tips on reducing taxes, and increasing your wealth.

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Business Strategies, business taxes, Family Tax Issues, General Information, Retirement Income, RUNNING YOUR BUSINESS, Self Employed, TAXES

Let’s face it, no one really likes to pay taxes.

Spanky little rascals

Author Trudy M. Howard

Let’s face it, no one really likes to pay taxes.

Unfortunately, while most Americans don’t like to pay taxes, we know that taxes have to be paid. As a self employed person, and business owner, not only do you have to pay local & state taxes, but you must also make Federal estimated tax payments throughout the year. Whenever I work with Chicago South Loop small business tax preparation customers, I find that they are often very surprised to hear about the estimated tax concept.

The American tax system is a a pay as you go system, not a pay once a year, or pay when you feel like it system. According to the IRS, “taxpayers must generally pay at least 90 percent of their taxes throughout the year through withholding, estimated tax payments or a combination of the two. If they don’t, they may owe an estimated tax penalty.” In most cases, you must pay estimated tax for 2019 if both of the following apply: 1. You expect to owe at least $1,000 in tax for 2019, after subtracting your withholding and refundable credits. You expect your withholding and refundable credits to be less than the smaller of: a. 90% of the tax to be shown on your 2019 tax return, or b. 100% of the tax shown on your 2018 tax return. Your 2018 tax return must cover all 12 months.

If you are a self employed driver (think UBER, LYFT, DOORDASH), contractor, real estate agent, barber, beautician, makeup artist, blogger, home care provider, etc. you need to have an EFTPS® account to make your Federal estimated tax payments. EFTPS® is a system for paying federal taxes electronically using the Internet, or by phone using the EFTPS® Voice Response System. EFTPS® is offered free by the U.S. Department of Treasury, however, you must setup an account to use the system. Listed below are the estimated quarterly tax payment dates for sole proprietors, and the quarterly payment dates for S-corp owners and C-corporations.

Estimated tax payment due dates for 2019:

April 15, 2019: Income tax due date AND the due date for your first quarterly estimated tax (QET) payment. In April, you’ll pay quarterly estimated taxes on the income you made in January, February, and March 2019.

June 17, 2019: This is when you’ll pay quarterly estimated taxes on the income you made in April, May, and June 2019.

September 16, 2019: Quarterly estimated taxes for the months of July, August, and September 2019 are due on this date.

January 15, 2020: Quarterly estimated taxes for the months of October, November, and December 2019 are due on this date.

For those that are S-corps or Corps. Remember that you are considered an employee, and a shareholder. This means that you’ll need to pay your income, social security, and Medicare taxes as the employer & the employee. In addition to making the deposits, you will also need to file quarterly payroll tax return. C-corporation owners will need to file estimated taxes on the corporations income, and file a 941 quarterly payroll return.

Here are the quarterly payroll tax return due dates for 2019:

April 30, 2019: File Form 941 – Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return. If you made all required payments in full by the due dates, you have 10 more days to submit this form (by February 10).

July 31st 2019: File Form 941 – Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return. If you made all required payments in full by the due dates, you have 10 more days to submit this form

October 31 2019 File Form 941 – Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return. If you made all required payments in full by the due dates, you have 10 more days to submit this form.

January 31, 2020: File Form 941 – Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return. If you made all required payments in full by the due dates, you have 10 more days to submit this form.

Although we’ve given you the basics, this is not an all-inclusive article. Should you have tax debt help questions, need Chicago business tax preparation, business entity creation, business insurance, or business compliance assistance please contact us online, or call our office toll free at 1-855-743-5765 or locally in Chicago or Indiana at 1-708-529-6604. Make sure to join our newsletter for more tips on reducing taxes, and increasing your wealth.

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Business Strategies, business taxes, General Information, RUNNING YOUR BUSINESS, Self Employed, Tax Reduction, TAXES

How the 90-Day Mileage Log Rule Works for You

fashion woman notebook pen

Often in an IRS audit, the examiner will ask for your mileage log at the beginning of the audit. If you do not have a mileage log, then you are in danger of losing more than just vehicle deductions. Think about it. If you don’t have a log for mileage, what is the IRS examiner going to think about your other records? Right—he or she is going to think you are a bad taxpayer with bad tax records who needs extra scrutiny.

The IRS says that you may keep an adequate record for part of a tax year and use that part-year record to substantiate your vehicle’s business use for the entire year. To use a sample record, you need to prove that your sample is representative of your use for the year.

By using your appointment book as the basis for your mileage, you not only build great business-use proof, but you also do a great job of showing that your sample vehicle record mirrors your general appointments during the year. (If you are using a mileage app, synchronize the app results with the appointment book.)

The IRS illustrates two possible sampling methods:

  • One identical week each month (for example, the third week of each month)
  • Three consecutive months

We don’t recommend the one-same-week-each-month method because it is difficult to start and stop a record-keeping process. (Think about how hard it would be to create a habit, undo it, and then create it again—every month.)

. For this reason, the three-month log is the superior alternative. Before getting into the three-month method, we should note that once you have done three months, you are in the habit. You might find it easier to continue all year, rather than stop this year and then have to start again next year.
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Here are the basics of how the IRS describes the three-month test:

  • The taxpayer uses her vehicle for business use.
  • She and other members of her family use the vehicle for personal use.
  • The taxpayer keeps a mileage log for the first three months of the taxable year, and that log shows that 75 percent of the vehicle’s use is for her business.
  • Invoices and paid bills show that her vehicle use is about the same throughout the year.

According to this IRS regulation, this three-month sample is adequate to prove 75 percent business use. Schedule-button-nb

Although we’ve given you the basics, this is not an all-inclusive article. Should you have tax debt help questions, need Chicago business tax preparation, business entity creation, business insurance, or business compliance assistance please contact us online, or call our office toll free at 1-855-743-5765 or locally in Chicago or Indiana at 1-708-529-6604. Make sure to join our newsletter for more tips on reducing taxes, and increasing your wealth.

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Fact check me with IRS Regulation 1.274-5T(c)(3)(ii)(A).

Business Strategies, business taxes, General Information, REAL ESTATE, RUNNING YOUR BUSINESS, Self Employed, TAX DEBT RELIEF, Tax Reduction, TAXES

TCJA Tax Reform Sticks It to Business Start-Ups That Lose Money

african american woman black girl black woman chair
The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) tax reform added an amazing limit on larger business losses that can attack you where it hurts—right in your cash flow.

And this new law works in some unusual ways that can tax you even when you have no real income for the year. When you know how this ugly new rule works, you have some planning opportunities to dodge the problem.

Over the years, lawmakers have implemented rules that limit your ability to use your business or rental losses against other income sources. The big three are:

  1. The “at risk” limitation, which limits your losses to amounts that you have at risk in the activity
  2. The partnership and S corporation basis limitations, which limit your losses to the extent of your basis in your partnership interest or S corporation stock
  3. The passive loss limitation, which limits your passive losses to the extent of your passive income unless an exception applies

 The TCJA tax reform added Section 461(l) to the tax code, and it applies to individuals (not corporations) for tax years 2018 through 2025.

The big picture under this new provision: You can’t use the portion of your business losses deemed by the new law to be an “excess business loss” in the current year. Instead, you’ll treat the excess business loss as if it were a net operating loss (NOL) carryover to the next taxable year.
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To determine your excess business loss, follow these three steps:

  1. Add the net income or loss from all your trade or business activities.
  2. If step 1 is an overall loss, then compare it to the maximum allowed loss amount: $250,000 (or $500,000 on a joint return).
  3. The amount by which your overall loss exceeds the maximum allowed loss amount is your new tax law–defined “excess business loss.”

Example. Paul invested $850,000 in a start-up business in 2018, and the business passed through a $750,000 loss to Paul. He has sufficient basis to use the entire loss, and it is not a passive activity. Paul’s wife had 2018 wages of $50,000, and they had other 2018 non-business income of $600,000.

Under prior law, Paul’s loss would offset all other income on the tax return and they’d owe no federal income tax. Under the TCJA tax reform that applies to years 2018 through 2025 (assuming the wages are trade or business income):

  • Their overall business loss is $700,000 ($750,000 – $50,000).
  • The excess business loss is $200,000 ($700,000 overall loss less $500,000).
  • $150,000 of income ($600,000 + $50,000 – $500,000) flows through the rest of their tax return.
  • They’ll have a $200,000 NOL to carry forward to 2019.

To avoid this ugly rule, you’ll need to keep your overall business loss to no more than $250,000 (or $500,000 joint). Your two big-picture strategies to make this happen are

  • accelerating business income, and
  • delaying business deductions.

Although we’ve given you the basics, this is not an all-inclusive article. Should you have tax debt help questions, need Chicago business tax preparation, business entity creation, business insurance, or business compliance assistance please contact us online, or call our office toll free at 1-855-743-5765 or locally in Chicago or Indiana at 1-708-529-6604. Make sure to join our newsletter for more tips on reducing taxes, and increasing your wealth.

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Business Strategies, business taxes, General Information, RUNNING YOUR BUSINESS, Self Employed, Tax Reduction, TAXES

Answers to Common Section 199A Questions

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#smallbiztaxlady 

I’ve been providing tax preparation for small business owners in Chicago’s south loop for quite awhile, and the new tax laws are benefiting business owners like never before! For many small businesses and the self-employed, the 20 percent tax deduction from new tax code Section 199A is the most valuable deduction to come out of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

The Section 199A tax deduction is complicated, and many questions remain unanswered even after the IRS issued its proposed regulations on the provision. And to further complicate matters, there’s also a lot of misinformation out there about Section 199A.

Below are answers to six common questions about this new 199A tax deduction.

Question 1. Are real estate agents and brokers in an out-of-favor specified service trade or business for purposes of Section 199A?

Answer 1. No.

Question 2. Do my S corporation shareholder wages count as wages paid by the S corporation for purposes of the 50 percent Section 199A wage limitation?

Answer 2. Yes.

Question 3. Will my allowable SEP/SIMPLE/401(k) contribution as a Schedule C taxpayer be based only on Schedule C net earnings, or do I first subtract the Section 199A deduction?
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Answer 3. You’ll continue to use Schedule C net earnings with no adjustment for Section 199A.

Question 4. Is my qualified business income for the Section 199A deduction reduced by either bonus depreciation or Section 179 expensing?

Answer 4. Yes, to both.

Question 5. I took out a loan to buy S corporation stock. The interest is deductible on my Schedule E. Does the interest reduce my Section 199A qualified business income?

Answer 5. Yes, in most circumstances.

Question 6. The out-of-favor specified service trade or business does not qualify for the Section 199A deduction, correct?

Answer 6. Incorrect.

Looking at your taxable income is the first step to see whether you qualify for the Section 199A tax deduction. If your taxable income on IRS Form 1040 is $157,500 or less (single) or $315,000 or less (married, filing jointly) and you have a pass-through business such as a proprietorship, partnership, or S corporation, you qualify for the Section 199A deduction.

With taxable income equal to or below the thresholds above, your type of pass-through business makes no difference. Retail store owners and medical doctors with income equal to or below the thresholds qualify in the same exact manner.

Although we’ve given you the basics, this is not an all-inclusive article. Should you have tax debt help questions, need Chicago business tax preparation, business entity creation, business insurance, or business compliance assistance please contact us online, or call our office toll free at 1-855-743-5765 or locally in Chicago or Indiana at 1-708-529-6604. Make sure to join our newsletter for more tips on reducing taxes, and increasing your wealth.

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business taxes, General Information, RUNNING YOUR BUSINESS, Self Employed, TAX DEBT RELIEF

Do You Make This Big Mistake with Your Independent Contractors?

grey metal hammer

I often deal with Chicago small business owners taxes, and the one thing that I see is a big mistake being made with independent contractors. Do you hire 1099 contractors? Are they really 1099 contractors? If so, have you done the one thing you need to do to protect their 1099 status so you don’t get hit with payroll taxes and penalties?

If you failed this one thing, the IRS can reclassify your 1099 contractors as W-2 employees even when you have a good case for their 1099 contractor status. This should scare you. Let’s review the Kurek tax court case (UNITED STATES TAX COURT MIECZYSLAW KUREK, Petitioner v. COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE)to see why.

Mieczyslaw Kurek operated a construction business that made improvements to the interiors of homes, including kitchens, bathrooms, and floors, where he and his workers installed tile, sheetrock, doors, and windows and did carpentry and painting. During the year before the court, Mr. Kurek had 29 contractors, of which only seven did some work in all four quarters of the calendar year.
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Relationship with Workers

Mr. Kurek had the following relationships with the workers:

  • He told the workers what work needed to be done and set deadlines for the jobs.
  • The workers worked on projects. No one worked full time for Mr. Kurek.
  • Mr. Kurek negotiated a flat fee and timeline with each worker for the work to be done on the project.
  • He paid each worker every week according to the percentage of the work the worker completed.
  • He paid the workers by checks made out to them personally.

How the Work Was Done

  • The workers set their own hours and work schedules.
  • Mr. Kurek came to the worksite every day or two.
  • Mr. Kurek did not tell the workers how to do their jobs, but he replaced workers who missed deadlines.
  • If he thought a worker was doing the work improperly, he would order the worker to repair the problem or redo the work.
  • Mr. Kurek allowed the workers to work simultaneously on other projects with him or with other independent construction groups.
  • The workers brought their own sets of small tools to the work-sites, worth around $1,000.
  • Mr. Kurek bought or rented the larger tools and he left them at the work sites for use by the workers.

No Office or Benefits

Mr. Kurek did not provide an office or any other facility for the workers. He did not:

  • Train the workers.
  • Offer them any employee benefits such as sick or vacation pay, medical insurance, or pension plans.
  • Carry unemployment insurance, severance pay, or workers’ compensation insurance on the workers.
  • Require the workers to have any type of insurance or license.

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Your Opinion

Based on what you know from what you have read above, are the workers 1099 independent contractors or W-2 employees?

What Did You Pick: Employee or Contractor?

Interestingly, you could be right with either choice. Because Mr. Kurek failed the one test that could have saved independent contractor status for his workers, the court used the seven common-law factors to evaluate employee status and it ruled that the workers were W-2 employees.

The IRS has a 20-factor test to determine if a worker is a 1099 independent contractor or a W-2 employee. But if Mr. Kurek does this one thing, he does not have to face the 20 factors, just as he doesn’t have to suffer the court’s seven-factor test.

Escape
IRS Publication 1976, Do You Qualify for Relief under Section 530, says that Mr. Kurek could have treated his workers as 1099 independent contractors if he had:

  1. A reasonable basis for treating the workers as independent contractors, such as showing that a significant segment of home improvement businesses treated their workers as independent contractors or relying on the advice of a lawyer or accountant who knew the facts about his business.
  2. Consistently treated the workers and all similar workers as independent contractors.
  3. Filed the 1099s for those independent contractor workers to whom he had paid $600 or more.

Failure
Mr. Kurek failed to file the 1099s. With this failure, he simply said

  • Hello IRS,
  • Goodbye Section 530 statutory relief,
  • Goodbye 1099 worker status, and
  • Hello payroll taxes and penalties.

Because Mr. Kurek failed to file the required 1099s, the court could not grant relief under Section 530 and had no choice but to examine the seven common-law factors. Sadly, the court’s application of the seven factors to Mr. Kurek’s workers caused the court to reclassify the workers from independent contractor status to W-2 employees.

What You Need to Do
Make your life easy. Avoid the big hurdles of the tax court’s seven-factor common-law tests or the IRS’s 20-factor common-law tests. You want to qualify for Section 530 relief. To ensure that relief: File the 1099s—period.

Although we’ve given you the basics, this is not an all-inclusive article. Should you have tax debt help questions, need Chicago business tax preparation, business entity creation, business insurance, or business compliance assistance please contact us online, or call our office toll free at 1-855-743-5765 or locally in Chicago or Indiana at 1-708-529-6604. Make sure to join our newsletter for more tips on reducing taxes, and increasing your wealth.

Never miss another tip again! Join our newsletter, to receive tax reduction/wealth building tips delivered right to your inbox!

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Fact check me: T.C. Memo. 2013-64 UNITED STATES TAX COURT MIECZYSLAW KUREK, Petitioner v. COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE, Respondent Docket No. 5459-11. Filed February 28, 2013.

Section 530 Tax Relief: IRS publication 1976 Section 530.

Family Tax Issues, General Information, Self Employed

Tax Consequences of Bartering & Trading

bartering 2
When it comes to filing taxes in Chicago, many residents believe that they don’t have to file taxes because they were not paid via a W2, 1099, or with cash payments. However, even if you don’t receive cash in exchange for work done, if you receive property or you “bartered” services, you have to report the FAIR MARKET VALUE of the service/property as SELF EMPLOYMENT INCOME
For example, let’s say one of my baker friends wanted to pay me with cakes (a girl can dream can’t she?) to prepare her taxes, and I agreed to take 5 $50 cakes in exchange for my tax preparation services. Once our transaction was done, the IRS would expect me to report the value of those cakes, and pay self employment taxes on the value of the services/property that what we bartered! Don’t believe me? Read the law for yourself below.
Per the IRS: “Bartering is an exchange of property or services. You must include in your income, at the time received, the fair market value of property or services you receive in bartering. If you exchange services with another person and you both have agreed ahead of time on the value of the services, that value will be accepted as fair market value unless the value can be shown to be otherwise. Generally, you report this income on Schedule C (Form 1040) or Schedule C-EZ (Form 1040). However, if the barter involves an exchange of something other than services, such as in Example 4, later, you may have to use another form or schedule instead.”
FACT CHECK me with IRS publication 525 PAGE 19. I’ve included the link to  the IRS tax publication here: https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p525.pdf
 
Although we’ve given you the basics, this is not an all-inclusive article. Should you have tax debt help questions, need Chicago business tax preparation, business entity creation, business insurance, or business compliance assistance please contact us online, or call our office toll free at 1-855-743-5765 or locally in Chicago or Indiana at 1-708-529-6604. Make sure to join our newsletter for more tips on reducing taxes, and increasing your wealth.

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